National News of Canada

While Trudeau ‘Cherry Picks’ Whole Foods, AWN Says it’s Time to Clear Don Cherry and Honor Our Veterans

Since mask-wearing is with us for now, how about a creating a new design under the auspices of Don Cherry to ‘wear the poppy’ long-term?

EDITORIAL: By AWN Staff

How long must “political correctness” rule the roost in Canada? How many more times must we shut down, ignore, rebuke or fire people simply for speaking their mind, or consign them to the “dungeon” when we don’t necessarily know all the facts?

Those who’ve bitten the dust, or have been seriously demoted, ignored or denigrated in this manner, have surnames like Brown, Beyak and, among several others, Cherry . . . Don Cherry.

Is the simple time-honored axiom, “I may not agree with what you’re saying, but I will defend your right to say it,” now a relic of the past, torn off its pedestal in the manner that the Champlain statue in Orillia, ON was brusquely removed from its foundation, never to return?

Remember, that happened because some chose to narrowly interpret the intentions of the statue’s creator and decided they were offended, instead of considering the intent and labour of the artist who made the statue possible with malice toward none.

The bottom line is we should not be so quick to simply tear down or rebuke things with which we disagree. It would make much more sense to create new monuments that reflect new ideas and leave our history, both the good and the bad, intact so future generations can learn the full scope of things. In other words, let’s live and let live. Isn’t that the only fair and objective way?

TRUDEAU ‘CHERRY PICKS’ WHOLE FOODS: LOTS OF IRONY

Most of us remember that Don Cherry, Canada’s iconic, widely loved sportscaster on “Hockey Night,” had to “walk the plank” of political correctness when his on-air comments, just over a year ago, about “you people” not wearing a poppy for Remembrance Day set off a needless media-hyped “firestorm” because some chose to be offended over claims that Cherry’s well-intended remarks were somehow “insensitive” and “racist” toward immigrants— rather than what they actually were: straight talk in support of the veterans that Cherry has unwaveringly supported throughout his career.

Seriously, the words “you people” are not expletives, nor do they constitute any kind of threat, nor are they in anyway illegal or indisputably “racist.” They’re just Don Cherry. Candor was his claim to fame. Why would we ever have expected anything different? Why should he change his persona and his style just because immigrants, in his opinion, should join Canada in honoring its vets just one day out the year—Remembrance Day, Nov. 11th.

Didn’t our vets fight and often die to protect the sacred right of free speech that’s free of reprisals and suppression? Thus, isn’t securing everyone’s right to speak out, whether we personally agree with them or not, the best way to honor our vets?

Remember, the principle is to defend Cherry’s right to speak freely, just as any of us would want our rights to speak freely protected, without fear of reprisal.

But fast forward to the present, and we see Liberal PM Justin Trudeau publicly scolding the U.S.-based organic grocer, Whole Foods, for telling its employees in its Canada stores that they cannot wear poppies on Remembrance Day.

True, Whole Foods should not have such a policy. When in Canada, do as the Canadians do: Honor the vets. At least leave it up the employees on whether to wear poppies on that national holiday.

So, what’s the real problem? The problem is that when Don Cherry scolded the public for not wearing poppies, he was canned by Sportsnet/Rogers Media—which proves the media outlet would rather be politically correct than take either a neutral stance and leave it alone, or support Cherry because he supports the vets.

However, the overriding point here is that due to Trudeau’s self-perception as a political “untouchable,” he can be pro-poppy and score political points—which at least suggests he may be a bit insincere and self-serving in his condemnation—yet Cherry, whose sincerity is beyond dispute, was shown the door, a great career over in minutes.

And when Cherry was instantly canned without appeal in Canada’s “court of public opinion,” did he get any support from the Trudeau government? You know the answer already.

If Whole Foods can be scolded for not allowing its employees to wear Remembrance poppies, then Sportsnet could have and probably should have been scolded for firing its most-loved sports figure for strongly supporting the wearing of poppies.

A HELPFUL IDEA TO CONSIDER

In order to transcend the suffocating PC culture and simply do something that’s supportive of the veterans during and beyond Remembrance Day, perhaps Mr. Cherry would entertain the following idea: Create a covid-protection mask design that serves the dual purpose of honoring and aiding the nation’s veterans, who already are feeling financially pinched due to covid-related slow-downs, shut-downs etc. of the economy.

Try this on for size: Mr. Cherry could obtain a copyright in his name for a mask design that shows the embroidered image of a poppy. A message that would be part of the design could say something like: “Don Cherry recommends everyone purchase a mask; all proceeds go to Canada’s veterans.”

Cherry likely has marketing connections that could make this happen. And local and national Legion outlets could get involved, especially with distribution and local fund-raising.

In posting this article, Awakening News wanted to step up to the plate and propose this idea to try and appeal to those who’d like to put the court of public opinion in “recess” and do something positive that actual helps the Legion and the veterans recover from the effects of enforcing covid regulations. Perhaps honoring, as well as actually helping, our vets could become an ongoing, virtually year-around thing, instead of focusing most of our efforts on one fleeting day each Nov. 11th.

Think about it. Isn’t it time for a change? Times are tough enough as it is. Let’s do the right thing.

 

 

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